Monthly Archives: January 2017

The Value of Time

Time is valuable. Psychiatrist and author M. Scott Peck said, “Until you value yourself, you won’t value your time. Until you value your time, you will not do anything with it.”

In What to Do Between Birth and Death, Charles Spezzano says that people don’t pay for things with money; they pay for them with time. If you say to yourself, In five years, I’ll have put enough away to buy that vacation house, then what you are really saying is that the house will cost you five years—one-twelfth of your adult life. “The phrase spending your time is not a metaphor,” said Spezzano. “It’s how life works.”

Instead of thinking about what you do and what you buy in terms of money, think about them in terms of time. Think about it. What is worth spending your life on? Seeing your work in that light just may change the way you manage your time.

—The 360° Leader – John Maxwell – The Daily Reader

ARE THE TASKS ON TODAY’S AGENDA WORTHY OF YOUR LIFE?

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The 30-Second Rule

When most people meet others, they search for ways to make themselves look good. The key to the 30-Second Rule is reversing this practice. When you make contact with people, instead of focusing on yourself, search for ways to make them look good.

Every day before I meet with people, I pause to think about something encouraging I can tell them. What I say can be one of many things: I might thank them for something they’ve done for me or for a friend. I might tell others about one of their accomplishments. I might praise them for a personal quality they exhibit. Or I might simply compliment their appearance. The practice isn’t complicated, but it does take some time, effort, and discipline. The reward for practicing it is huge, because it really makes a positive impact on people.

—25 Ways to Win with People – John Maxwell – The Daily Reader

TAKE THIRTY SECONDS WITH EACH PERSON YOU MEET TODAY TO ADD VALUE TO THEM.

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The Law of Connection

The stronger the relationship you form with followers, the greater the connection you forget—and the more likely those followers will be to want to help you. Whether you’re speaking in front of a large audience or chatting in the hallway with an individual, the guidelines are the same.
1. Connect with Yourself: You must know who you are and have confidence in yourself if you desire to connect with others.
2. Communicate with Openness and Sincerity: Legendary NFL coach Bill Walsh said, “Nothing is more effective than sincere, accurate praise, and nothing is more lame than a cookie-cutter compliment.”
3. Know Your Audience: Learn people’s names, find out about their histories, ask about their dreams. Speak to what they care about.
4. Live Your Message: Practice what you preach. That’s where credibility comes from.
5. Go to Where They Are: I dislike any kind of barrier to communication. I adapt to others; I don’t expect them to adapt to me.
6. Focus on Them, Not Yourself: The number one problem of inexperienced speakers and ineffective leaders is that they focus on themselves.
7. Believe in Them: It’s one thing to communicate to people because you believe you have something of value to say. It’s another to communicate with people because you believe they have value.
8. Offer Direction and Hope: French general Napoleon Bonaparte said, “Leaders are dealers in hope.”

—The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership – John Maxwell-Daily Reader

INTENTIONALLY CONNECT WITH THE PEOPLE YOU LEAD TODAY.

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Be Impressed, Not Impressive

Too often we think that if we can impress others, we will gain influence with them. We want to become others’ heroes—to be larger than life. That creates a problem because we’re real live human beings. People can see us for who we really are. If we make it our goal to impress them, we puff up our pride and end up being pretentious—and that turns people off.

If you want to influence others, don’t try to impress them. Pride is really nothing more than a form of selfishness, and pretense is only a way to keep people at arm’s length so that they can’t see who you really are. Instead of impressing others, let them impress you.

It’s really a matter of attitude. The people with charisma, those who attract others to themselves, are individuals who focus on others, not themselves. They ask questions of others. They listen. They don’t try to be the center of attention. And they never try to pretend they’re perfect.

—The 360° Leader-John Maxwell-Daily Readers

SPEND TODAY LISTENING TO OTHERS
AND LETTING THEM IMPRESS YOU.

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Leaders See Within the Larger Context

LEADERS SEE WITHIN THE LARGER CONTEXT
Most people evaluate events in their lives according to how they will be personally affected. Leaders think within a broader context. They start by asking themselves, How will this impact my people? But then they also look at how something will impact those above and beside them. They try to see everything in terms of the entire organization and beyond.

Effective leaders know the answers to the following questions:
• How do I fit in my area or department?
• How do all the departments fit into the organization?
• Where does our organization fit in the market?
• How is our market related to other industries and the economy?

And as industries in our economy become more global, many good leaders are thinking even more broadly!

You don’t have to become a global economist to lead effectively from the middle of your organization. The point is that 360-Degree Leaders see their area as part of the larger process and understand how the pieces of the larger puzzle fit together. If you desire to be a better leader, then broaden your thinking and work at seeing things from a larger perspective.

—The 360° Leader – John Maxwell-The Daily Reader

WHAT POSITIVE IMPROVEMENTS CAN YOU MAKE TODAY BASED ON YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF HOW YOU FIT WITHIN YOUR AREA, ORGANIZATION, MARKET, AND INDUSTRY?

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The Law of Priorities

THE LAW OF PRIORITIES
When we are busy, we naturally believe that we are achieving. But busyness does not equal productivity. Activity is not necessarily accomplishment. Prioritizing requires leaders to continually think ahead, to know what’s important, to know what’s next, to see how everything relates to the overall vision.

•What Is Required? What must I do that nobody can or should do for me?

• What Gives the Greatest Return? Work in your areas of greatest strength. Is there something you’re doing that can be done 80 percent as well by someone else? If so, delegate it.

• What Brings the Greatest Reward? Life is too short not to do some things you love. What energizes you and keeps you passionate?

—The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership – John Maxwell – The Daily Reader

TODAY GIVE YOUR TIME ONLY TO THINGS THAT PASS THE REQUIREMENT, RETURN, REWARD TEST.

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Point Out People’s Strengths

POINT OUT PEOPLE’S STRENGTHS
People often make a mistake in their personal development when they focus too much on their weaknesses. As a result, they spend all their time trying to shore up those weaknesses instead of maximizing the strengths they possess. Similarly, it’s a mistake to focus on the weaknesses of others. The self-proclaimed “experts” who spend their time telling others what’s wrong with them never win with people. Most people simply avoid them.

Instead, we need to focus on finding people’s strengths and pointing them out. Most people have strengths that they rarely get to use. Those strengths may be job skills, knowledge, general abilities, personality characteristics, or other attributes. I once read an interesting fact based on research, saying that every person can do at least one thing better than ten thousand other people. Think about that! You possess an ability that can’t be matched by anyone in your town or neighborhood . . . or in your college or university . . . or in your company or maybe even in your industry.

Have you discovered that ability? If so, you are probably well on your way to pursuing your life’s purpose. If you haven’t, wouldn’t you love it if someone came alongside you and pointed it out? How would you feel about that person? I bet you’d be pretty grateful.

Why not try to become that kind of person in someone else’s life? When you do, you just might be helping others to discover the thing God created them to do.

—25 Ways to Win with People-John Maxwell

POINT OUT A GREAT STRENGTH OF
SOMEONE IN YOUR LIFE TODAY.

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